Thursday, July 12, 2012

Young Goethe In Love

Guys, I think we just need to sit here for a moment while I bask in this fact: I've found a new favorite period piece. And you should know, that it takes A LOT for me to get all caught up in my FEELINGS and actually have a new favorite. You think to yourself, can it really get any better than North and South, Jane Eyre, or Pride and Prejudice? Let me tell you, dear readers, it can be just as good! JUST AS GOOD! Which should give us hope, because us Victorian Swaggers can not live on classics alone, sometimes it's nice to know that a new piece can be thrown into the mix and be just as jaw-droppingly amazing. So lets take the next few moments to appreciate this new smelling salts classic than I am oh-so-happy just happened to show up in my Netflix suggestions queue the other night.

To clarify, first, I'd better tell you that Young Goethe in Love, as it is called here in the United States, goes simply by Goethe! in Germany where it was released, which makes it, as you can guess, a German film (but it comes with subtitles for those of you who spreche kein Deutsch.) Now that we've got that out of the way, lets get on with the fan-flailing. 
Johann Goethe very much had me at hello, or I should say he had me at lecket mich (which I shall leave up to your own translations. It's an act of defiance against his stodgy father who thinks there would be nothing greater in life than for his son to follow in his footsteps and become a lawyer. But, of course, our dreamy young Goethe has other things in mind, for he desires nothing more than to be a poet. As handsome male protagonists often are, he is cocky (sa-woon) and purposefully fails his final law review, which does not make for a happy father. When a rejection letter arrives in the mail for his latest story, Papa says that he has had enough and sends Johann off "to the sticks" as he so aptly describes it, to study law for a year, seriously. 

Now, of course, he goes to to the sleepy little town court where he shall surely be bored and falls in love. Not immediately, of course, first he makes a friend, and begins to learn to work hard and appreciate the law, and he even wins over the pompous head clerk. But when he meets Lotte, everything else just seems so... unimportant. And this is where I should tell you to make sure you've restocked your supply of petticoats and handkerchiefs and smelling salts because your FEELINGS ARE JUST GOING TO GET THE BEST OF YOU, okay? OKAY! (Because YouTube is stupid and doesn't have the clips I want to show you, we'll just have to settle for the trailer and pictures.)


I mean, even the trailer is just ASJKLLSHDJKLASGHD! I'm going to take a page from Sally's book and break down one of the most smelling-salt worthy scenes I've ever seen.
(By this point in the film, Johann is pretty positive that he's never going to be a poet or a writer. He has accepted his fate as a lawyer, and although Lotte has asked him to recite something he's written, he hasn't obliged her.)
Lotte: Will you recite something for me today?
YES, please do!
Goethe: Perhaps another day.
NO NO NO, NOW!
Lotte: You won't get away with that stuff today.
That's right! Make me swoon!
Goethe: It's kids stuff, all of it...
Liar.
Lotte: I beg you.
*flashes petticoats*
Goethe: It's ridiculous scribbling and rhyming...
....
Lotte: You are a coward.
Darn right.
Goethe: Discreet.
pshaw
Lotte: Cautious.
Goethe: Humble.
Lotte: Very well, I will not breathe again until you've recited something.
Oh dear, is this a good idea?
Goethe: That is boldly crazy. And absurd, too, Miss Buff.
Well, maybe, but I'm pretty sure I love you, and love is crazy, so...
Lotte: *passes out*
I knew this would happen.
Goethe: Stop it! Alright, you win...
Sweet victory.
Goethe: Quick
                 beat my heart: to horse,
                 Haste, haste,
                 And lo!
                 twas done with the speed of light;
                 The evening
                 soon the world embraced,
                 And o'er the mountains hung the night.
                 I saw thee, and with tender pride
                 Felt thy sweet gaze pour joy on me;
                 While all my heart was at thy side.
                 And every breath I breathed
                 for thee.
Dead. On the floor. In a pile of still smoldering petticoats. THE PROXIMITY!!! Who has those smelling salts?
Lotte: Ridiculous.
EXCUSE ME? I WILL FIGHT YOU!
Lotte: It is truly ridiculous...
Didn't you hear me, you crazy girl?
Lotte: ...that you don't believe in yourself.
Oh, well, yes, I agree. 

If you're still alive after that scene, although, frankly, I'm not sure how you are, then you'd better put on about fifty of those frilly undergarments from your stash, because they're about to be gone.
I JUST.... I MEAN. Y'ALL! This film is P-E-R-F-E-C-T-I-O-N! The gorgeous scenery and the score (OH THE SCORE, I die) and the PROXIMITY and the costumes and the actors. I can't even. It's in the TOP 5 Holy Grail period piece list. I KNOW, RIGHT?! It's just that good. And if you're not dissolved into a puddle of feelings induced creyes by the end, then I think you're on the wrong blog. 

5 comments:

  1. WHAT THE! OH MY! I CAN'T SEE STRAIGHT! NEED IN MY LIFE! *GRABBY HANDS*!!!!!!!!

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  2. YES. EVERYONE GO WATCH ASAP, actually, I think I might need to re-watch it tonight, because if Sally's watching it's only right that I watch along with her..... RIGHT?! RIGHT?!

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  3. HOLY FRICK, MARIAH! I JUST GOT TO THE KISS AND I! CAN! NOT! EVEN!!!!!!!!!!!!! I HAVE DIED! I HAVE LITERALLY DIED!

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  4. Thoughts the morning after: so basically I want to forsake my own life and live in this movie...

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